Luke 7:1-10 “Go, Come, Do” JUMC 20130602

Capernaum Synogage 20111

Capernaum Synogage 20111

After Jesus had finished all his sayings in the hearing of the people, he entered Capernaum. A centurion there had a slave whom he valued highly, and who was ill and close to death. When he heard about Jesus, he sent some Jewish elders to him, asking him to come and heal his slave. When they came to Jesus, they appealed to him earnestly, saying, “He is worthy of having you do this for him, for he loves our people, and it is he who built our synagogue for us.” And Jesus went with them, but when he was not far from the house, the centurion sent friends to say to him, “Lord, do not trouble yourself, for I am not worthy to have you come under my roof; therefore I did not presume to come to you. But only speak the word, and let my servant be healed. For I also am a man set under authority, with soldiers under me; and I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes, and to another, ‘Come,’ and he comes, and to my slave, ‘Do this,’ and the slave does it.” When Jesus heard this he was amazed at him, and turning to the crowd that followed him, he said, “I tell you, not even in Israel have I found such faith.” When those who had been sent returned to the house, they found the slave in good health. [NRSV]

I tell you not even in Israel have I found such faith

For United Methodist her in the southeast, you might say, not even in Nashville, Candler nor Epworth-by-the-Sea. These epicenters for the work of our church Jesus highlights someone who is miles away for the expected place for faithfulness.

In this text, Jesus is in Capernaum and is talking about the actions of a Roman soldier’s leadership, witness and faith as a model for the community.

Crossing lines of division to find the heart of Jesus

The Centurion was a responsible officier of an elete guard representing Rome.

The Action plan is the same

Go, Come, Do

Communion Connection:

The table was prepared as Jesus told Disciples to Go prepare the table,

Come to the open table

and Do this in Remembrance

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